Our Future Plan

Weeds and Pest Animal Management

What are the risks to effective weed and pest animal management in the region?

Risks to effective weed and pest animal management in the region identified by the technical review panel generally fall into three categories, natural-based events, not enough resourcing and not enough coordination and collaboration on resourcing. Some of the current and future risks identified are:

  • ongoing access to good science,
  • political perception of the importance of weed and pest animal management,
  • legislative constraints for technology,
  • sharing of government-owned data,
  • confidentiality of third party data,
  • resourcing for Local Government compliance and natural resource management,
  • resourcing for state government management programs,
  • contestability – for example not allowed to provide subsidised baits if private contractors offer same service,
  • devolvement of responsibilities under the Biosecurity Act 2014 (QDAFF), and
  • natural disasters and climatic variability.

 

As mentioned in the overview section, the climatic variability experienced in the past ten years in the region is characteristic of what to expect under climate change. The effects on weed and pest animal management in the region identified by Tim Low (2009) and the National Agriculture and Climate Change Action Plan (NRMMC and COAG 2008), are as follows:

  • climatic variation in the form of increased extreme events such as drought and flood create more pathways and opportunity for weed and pest animal spread,
  • many weeds and pest animals are linked to riparian zones for their survival, so flooding and drying regimes will affect populations and distribution,
  • factors like water availability and competition will continue to have the greatest impact on pest plant populations,
  • temperature change will not have a huge impact on weed and pest animal location and persistence,
  • the adaptive capability of weeds and pest animals indicates they will increase in spread and remain competitive under a climate change scenario,
  • increased incidence of fire needs to be considered in future weed and pest animal management activities, as both a risk and a management tool, and
  • individual weed and pest animal species will each have a different response to climate change conditions and the ecology of each species needs to be considered in future planning.

 


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